Marcia Lippman / Gallery Stock

The Military’s Secret Shame

Jesse Ellison
Newsweek
April 3, 2011

Greg Jeloudov was 35 and new to America when he decided to join the Army. Like most soldiers, he was driven by both patriotism for his adopted homeland and the pragmatic notion that the military could be a first step in a career that would enable him to provide for his new family. Instead, Jeloudov arrived at Fort Benning, Ga., for basic training in May 2009, in the middle of the economic crisis and rising xenophobia. The soldiers in his unit, responding to his Russian accent and New York City address, called him a “champagne socialist” and a “commie faggot.”

He was, he told NEWSWEEK, “in the middle of the viper’s pit.” Less than two weeks after arriving on base, he was gang-raped in the barracks by men who said they were showing him who was in charge of the United States. When he reported the attack to unit commanders, he says they told him, “It must have been your fault. You must have provoked them.”

To read the full article at Newsweek, click here.

 

Contact Service Women’s Action Network (SWAN) for information on the Military Rape Litigation filled on behalf of military and former military victims of Military Sexual Trauma (MST), including persons who were raped by their military colleagues.

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