May 2012


Veterans Chuck Medals Towards NATO Conference

 

Tyler Davis
Gapers Block
May 20, 2012

Thousands marched from Grant Park to the intersection Michigan Avenue and Cermak Road, about two miles, led by the Iraq Veterans Against the War (IVAW). At the end of the march, as close to the NATO conference at McCormick Place as the demonstrators were allowed to go, veterans of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan threw their military service medals onto the ground as a symbolical gesture of their disapproval.

“This medal right here is for the one-third of women in the military who are sexually assaulted by their peers,” said Aaron Hughes, who served in the National Guard from 2000-2006, as he threw a medal towards McCormick Place. “And this medal right here is because I’m sorry.”

“Our enemies are not 7,000 miles away, they sit in board rooms,” said Vince Emanuel, a veteran.

Although the protestors made it to the intersection with no incident, a clash between police and protestors occurred after the ceremony.

To view this story on the Gapers Block web site, click here.

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Military Rape Speech 20 by Congresswoman Jackie Speier

 

Congresswoman Jackie Speier
May 17, 2012

 

 

Today I rise again to speak about the horrific situation in the military and that is the epidemic of rape and sexual assault that goes on unabated. This is the 20th time that I’m here on the floor to tell the story of yet another victim. 19 times before I’ve been on this floor to tell about victims in military service. I’ve told you about the military culture that treats sexual harassment and assault with a silent acceptance, and the command structure that punishes the victim and does not take care of dealing with the perpetrator.

Today i am going to tell you about the culture that exists in our military service academies that train our cadets to become commissioned officers. I’ve not told you that the same conflicted chain of command structure that exists in the military also exists at our prestigious service academies. The military academy at West Point and the Naval, Coast Guard, Air Force and Merchant Marine follow the same rules of the military. The Uniform Code of Military Justice. Today I’m going to tell you the story of Karley Marquet who was a first-year cadet when she was raped just last year.

She was a spanking brand new West Pointer, gifted in both academics and athletics, Karley was a star high school student. She had her pick to go to any number of colleges. She chose West Point because she wanted to serve her country. West Point chose Karley because she possessed the skills and character that the Army needs for success.

Click the link to view or read Congresswoman Speier’s 20th speech on military rape.

To view Congresswoman Speier’s speeches on military rape, click this usmvaw page link.

 

For additional information:

Rep. Jackie Speier | Rape and Sexual Assault in the Military

Protect Our Defenders

Letter to STOP Act Co-Sponsors (call to action)

 

“H.R. 3435, the Sexual Assault Training Oversight and Prevention Act – or STOP Act which would take the reporting, oversight, investigation and victim care of sexual assaults out of the hands of the military’s normal chain of command and place jurisdiction in the newly created, autonomous Sexual Assault Oversight and Response Office comprised of civilian and military experts.”  (Rep. Jackie Speier)

To see the current status of “The STOP Act” click the links below:

STOP Act Summary

The Stop Act: The Sexual Assault Training Oversight and Prevention Act (H.R. 3435)

I Served My Country and
Lost My Privacy

 

 

Carey D. Lohrenz
First Female F-14 Fighter Pilot
Huffington Post
May 14, 2012

 

Women have been flying military aircraft since 1942. The WASPs, or Women’s Airforce Service Pilots, ferried 12,650 fighter and bomber planes all over the US, Canada and overseas when needed. They also instructed Air Corps pilots and towed practice targets for combat pilots.

However, women were limited to noncombat roles.

Over the course of time, the nature of warfare has changed. Women have become an integral part of the armed forces.

The Persian Gulf War, in 1990-1991, demonstrated how integral women had become to U.S. airpower. Female pilots flew various helicopters, reconnaissance, refueling and supply aircraft deep into Iraqi airspace. They loaded weapons onto fighters and directed Air Force pilots from AWACS planes.

But the final frontier for female aviators was to fly the coveted combat fighter jets and bombers.

To read the full story at the Huffington Post, click here.

 

John W. Adkisson for The New York Times

Once Hailed as Army Pioneer, Now Battling to Stay on the Job

 

James Dao
The New York Times
May 11, 2012

 

When Command Sgt. Maj. Teresa L. King was named the first female commandant of the Army’s elite drill sergeant school in 2009, proponents of gender equality in the military hailed the news as a watershed.

Sergeant Major King headed the Army’s drill sergeant school at Fort Jackson, S.C.

But it did not take long for the grumbling to start. Students who flunked out of the school complained that she set unfair standards. Some of her own instructors said she rigidly enforced old-fashioned rules. Traditionalists across the service asked: how could a woman with no experience in combat manage the Army’s only school for training the trainers who prepare recruits for war?

She says she tried to ignore the criticism, but her superiors did not. Last November, they suspended Sergeant Major King, forbidding contact with students or staff and opening an investigation into what they called the “toxic” environment at the school. As that review dragged on, she says she felt like a criminal: isolated, publicly humiliated and so despondent that friends worried that she might hurt herself.

To read the full story at the New York Times, click here.

 

Additional Reporting from The New York Times:

At War Blog: Head of Drill Sergeant School Reinstated The New York Times, (May 4, 2012)

First Woman to Lead Army Drill Sergeant School Is Suspended  The New York Times, (December 15, 2011)

First Woman Ascends to Top Drill Sergeant Spot The New York Times, (September 22, 2009)

Third Suspect in Killgore Murder Connected to S&M

 

Peter Surowski
Temecula Patch
May 12, 2012

A woman who was arrested Thursday on suspicion of killing a Fallbrook resident was connected to the other suspects accused of the murder through an alternative, polyamorous relationship.

Dorothy Grace Marie Maraglino, 36, who was arrested on suspicion of killing 22-year-old Brittany Killgore, owned a house that the two other suspects list as their residence, according to the North County Times.

Maraglino also appears in photos with Louis Ray Perez, 45, one of the other suspects. Perez is a Camp Pendleton Marine staff sergeant.

He and fellow suspect Jessica Lynn Lopez, 27, pleaded not guilty to the murder last month.

To read the full story at the Temecula Patch web site, click here.

 

Additional Reporting:

Third Arrest Made In Killgore Murder Case, 10News.com, May 11, 2012

Dorothy Grace Marie Maraglino Arrested In Connection With Brittany Killgore Murder, Huffington Post, May 11, 2012

Prostitution and the U.S. Military

 

Kara Dixon Vuic
Richmond Times-Dispath
May 9, 2012

Recent news that nine military personnel and 11 Secret Service agents allegedly solicited prostitutes in Columbia has sparked a congressional inquiry, institutional investigations and much speculation about how such an act might threaten presidential security. Were these men just a few bad apples? Maybe. But the American military has a long history of sanctioning prostitution, one that suggests much deeper concerns about its cultivation of a sexualized culture that can help to explain such an astonishingly brash act.

Although the Civil War’s Gen. Joseph Hooker is probably the most well-known military commander to officially sanction prostitution, he is certainly not alone. American military history is littered with officials who drew connections between a soldier’s sexual habits and his battlefield performance. As Gen. George Patton put it most famously (and perhaps most crassly), “if they don’t [blank], they don’t fight.”

To read the full article at the Richmand Times-Dispatch, click here.

Article link thanks to H-Net Minerva

The Military Impacts in Hawai’i Should be a Warning to Koreans about the Threat to Jeju Island

 

Kyle Kajihiro
War is a Crime.org
May 10, 2012

It is a grave mistake to claim that military bases have been good for Hawai’i and therefore would be good for Jeju Island.

The U.S. invaded and occupied the sovereign country of Hawai’i in order to build a military outpost. This included the taking of more than 200,000 acres of land for military bases, training and other activities. The result has been the destruction of the environment with more than 900 military contamination sites identified by the Department of Defense. The military’s toxic cocktail includes PCB, perchloroethylene, jet fuel and diesel, mercury, lead, radioactive Cobalt 60, unexploded ordance, perchlorate, and depleted uranium.

When the U.S. took over, especially during WWII, the military seized thousands of acres of Hawaiian land. Whole communities were evicted, their homes, churches and buildings razed or bombed for target practice, their sacred sites destroyed by bombs or imprisoned behind barbed wire.

Recently, hundreds of landless Native Hawaiian families were evicted from a secluded area of O’ahu where they had been living in cars and makeshift tents. They are the internally displaced native people, evidence of the so-called ‘benefits’ of militarization. Meanwhile the military occupies more than 13,000 acres of Hawaiian land, comprising a third of the land in that part of the island.

To read the complete article at warisacrime.org, click here.

 

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