Media


Fixing a Broken System: Rape and Sexual Assault in the Military (September 2012)

 

The Hastings Women’s Law Journal symposium “Fixing a Broken System: Rape and Sexual Assault in the Military” was held September 28, 2012 at U.C. Hastings at the San Francisco Alumni Center was a resounding success.

For anyone who missed it, video of the symposium in its entirety is available through the U.C. Hastings Livestream website here: http://www.livestream.com/uchastings

Rape in the Military (Part 1/3)

Rape in the Military (Part 2/3)

Rape in the Military (part 3/3)

DADT – Zoe Dunning

List of Participating Speakers:

Congresswoman Jackie Speier (D-CA)
John D. Altenburg, Jr., Major General, U.S. Army (Ret.)
Philip D. Cave, Commander, U.S. Navy (Ret.)
Josh Connolly, Deputy Legislative Director, Office of Congresswoman Jackie Speier
Zoe Dunning, Commander, U.S. Navy (Ret.)
Kathleen Gilberd, Co-Chair, National Lawyer’s Guild Military Law Task Force
Maia Goodell, Chair, New York City Bar’s Military Affairs and Justice Committee
Victor M. Hansen, Professor of Law, New England Law Boston
Elizabeth L. Hillman, Professor of Law, University of California Hastings College of the Law
Shira Maguen, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor, Dept of Psychiatry, UCSF
Rachel Natelson, Legal Director, Service Women’s Action Network (SWAN)
Teresa Panepinto, Director of Legal Services, Swords to Plowshares
Kate Weber, Survivor of Military Sexual Trauma
Bridget J. Wilson, Esq., Major, California Guard, U.S. Army Reserve, Enlisted (Ret.)

Seminar Sponsors:

Combat Paper

The National Institute of Military Justice

The O’Brien Center for Scholarly Publications

The UCSF/UC Hastings Consortium on Law, Science & Health Policy

Advertisements

 

When “Jane” Comes Marching Home Again

 

Elayne Clift
Women’s Media Center
June 1, 2012

 

In May the Army began a new Defense Department policy that will open an additional 14,000 positions for women. Will we be ready for them when they come home?

It didn’t take long for Jenny McClendon, trained as a sonar operator in the Navy, to experience sexual harassment when she joined the military in 1997. Immediately subjected to harassment by her male counterparts when she refused their sexual advances, they said she wasn’t “tough enough to be in the military.” Finally she complained to superiors, who said that being harassed was a necessary part of training. A first class petty officer called her “a lesbian, a feminist, and a Democrat,” grounds for throwing her overboard, he said.

McClendon’s experience is not unusual. The kind of abuse she describes is widely acknowledged, although probably under-reported by female veterans. And it gets worse. Jenny McClendon was raped by a superior while on watch aboard her ship one night. It was the first of two “military sexual traumas” (MSTs) she suffered while in the service.

To read the full article at the WMC web site, click here.

Third Suspect in Killgore Murder Connected to S&M

 

Peter Surowski
Temecula Patch
May 12, 2012

A woman who was arrested Thursday on suspicion of killing a Fallbrook resident was connected to the other suspects accused of the murder through an alternative, polyamorous relationship.

Dorothy Grace Marie Maraglino, 36, who was arrested on suspicion of killing 22-year-old Brittany Killgore, owned a house that the two other suspects list as their residence, according to the North County Times.

Maraglino also appears in photos with Louis Ray Perez, 45, one of the other suspects. Perez is a Camp Pendleton Marine staff sergeant.

He and fellow suspect Jessica Lynn Lopez, 27, pleaded not guilty to the murder last month.

To read the full story at the Temecula Patch web site, click here.

 

Additional Reporting:

Third Arrest Made In Killgore Murder Case, 10News.com, May 11, 2012

Dorothy Grace Marie Maraglino Arrested In Connection With Brittany Killgore Murder, Huffington Post, May 11, 2012

The Military Impacts in Hawai’i Should be a Warning to Koreans about the Threat to Jeju Island

 

Kyle Kajihiro
War is a Crime.org
May 10, 2012

It is a grave mistake to claim that military bases have been good for Hawai’i and therefore would be good for Jeju Island.

The U.S. invaded and occupied the sovereign country of Hawai’i in order to build a military outpost. This included the taking of more than 200,000 acres of land for military bases, training and other activities. The result has been the destruction of the environment with more than 900 military contamination sites identified by the Department of Defense. The military’s toxic cocktail includes PCB, perchloroethylene, jet fuel and diesel, mercury, lead, radioactive Cobalt 60, unexploded ordance, perchlorate, and depleted uranium.

When the U.S. took over, especially during WWII, the military seized thousands of acres of Hawaiian land. Whole communities were evicted, their homes, churches and buildings razed or bombed for target practice, their sacred sites destroyed by bombs or imprisoned behind barbed wire.

Recently, hundreds of landless Native Hawaiian families were evicted from a secluded area of O’ahu where they had been living in cars and makeshift tents. They are the internally displaced native people, evidence of the so-called ‘benefits’ of militarization. Meanwhile the military occupies more than 13,000 acres of Hawaiian land, comprising a third of the land in that part of the island.

To read the complete article at warisacrime.org, click here.

 

Marine Pleads Not Guilty in the Killing of Another Marine’s Wife

 

Tony Perry
The Los Angeles Times
April 27, 2012

 

A Marine staff sergeant pleaded not guilty Thursday to a charge of murdering the 22-year-old wife of a fellow Marine as the prosecutor announced that the victim’s blood and a possible murder weapon were found in the defendant’s car.

A judge ordered Staff Sgt. Louis Perez, 45, held in jail on $3-million bail in the killing of Brittany Dawn Killgore, whose body was found dumped near Lake Skinner in Riverside County.

Killgore had been set to attend a dinner cruise in San Diego with Perez and his girlfriend on April 13 but instead sent a text message to a friend saying she was in “distress” and needed help, Deputy Dist. Atty. Patrick Espinoza said during an arraignment in San Diego County Superior Court. The friend was not identified.

To read the full story in the Los Angeles Times, click here.

 

Additional Reporting:

Marine Pleads Not Guilty In Death Of Fellow Marine’s Estranged Wife, CBS Los Angeles, April 26, 2012

Special Collection:

Sexual Violence in the Military

 

The National Online Resource Center on Violence Against Women (VAWnet.org) has assembled a Special Collection that “addresses sexual violence against military service members, defines Military Sexual Trauma (MST), and offers resources (including information on current policy, procedures, legislation, and litigation) to support the prevention of and response to sexual violence as it impacts service members and veterans in the United States.”

The online collection includes a glossary of terms, information from experts in fields of sexual violence and military cultureas well as US Department of Defense policy materials. It is a great resource for both scholars and interested citizens on the issues of military sexual violence.

 

According to the National Online Resource Center on Violence Against Women, the purpose of the special collection is to:

  • Provide information on issues and concepts specific to sexual violence against military service members;
  • Define the term Military Sexual Trauma;
  • Inform on current policy, procedures, legislation, and litigation that may impact members of the military, veterans, and advocates;
  • Offer resources for service members, veterans, advocates, educators, and prevention practitioners; and
  • Share additional resources and organizations serving as partners, collaborators, advocates, or allies for service members and veterans impacted by sexual violence.

 

To visit the special collection on Sexual Violence in the Military at VAWnet.org, click here.

 

Military Rapes Focus of Florida Produced Documentary

 

Mary Shedden
Tampa Bay Online
April 24, 2012

 

Deep scars left by the military’s historic handling of rape in its ranks won’t heal anytime soon, say viewers of a new, locally produced documentary.

Monday’s screening of “Uniform Betrayal: Rape in The Military” comes just a week after U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta announced new policies and training to address incidents of rape among active-duty personnel, estimated at 19,000 a year.

The film, however, points to a pervasive culture in the military that won’t change with a few policies. It profiles victims who have failed during the past 20-plus years to be heard or helped by the military justice system.

Two rape victims in the documentary said perpetrators included co-workers and supervisors who took advantage of the military’s hierarchy. Those who agreed to speak on camera struggled to share, and several never reported the rapes while they were serving, said Jennifer Molina, a veteran documentary maker.

“There’s no resolution. There’s no peace for these people,” said Molina, the film’s executive producer.

To read the full article on TBO.com, click here.

 

To visit the web site for the documentary, “Uniform Betrayal: Rape in The Military,” click here.

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