Uncategorized


VA/DoD PTSD Coach App Wins Innovation Award for Telemedicine Advancement

 

Veterans Today
March 30, 2012

 

 

The Department of Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense (DoD) Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) coach mobile application marked its first anniversary with receipt of an award for innovation in the advancement of telemedicine from the American Telemedicine Association.

“The health and well-being of our brave men and women who have served this Nation is our highest priority,” said Secretary Eric K. Shinseki. “Using the popularity of mobile devices, we can provide important tools to Veterans wherever they are, whenever they need them, whether or not they receive care through VA or DoD.”

PTSD Coach, collaboratively developed by VA’s National Center for PTSD and DoD’s National Center for Telehealth & Technology, provides education, symptoms-tracking tools, self-assessment and connections to support individuals with PTSD. Since its public release on April 11, 2011, the app has been downloaded more than 53,000 times in over 60 countries. It is available for free download for both iPhone and Android devices.

To read the full story on the Veterans Today web site, click here.

 

The PTSD Coach app can help you learn about and manage symptoms that commonly occur after trauma.

Features include:

  • Reliable information on PTSD and treatments that work.
  • Tools for screening and tracking your symptoms.
  • Convenient, easy-to-use skills to help you handle stress symptoms.
  • Direct links to support and help.
  • Always with you when you need it.

Download the mobile app:

Free PTSD Coach download from:
iTunes* and Android Market*

Advertisements

Sailor Sentenced to Life for Raping Girl

 

UPI
May 9, 2012

A U.S. sailor left Guam in Navy custody Wednesday after being sentenced to life in prison for repeatedly raping a girl starting when she was 8 years old.

Petty Officer 1st Class Bradford Laurence Lung, 30, had pleaded guilty Monday to 20 counts of first-degree criminal sexual conduct in Guam Superior Court, Stars and Stripes reported. He will be eligible for parole in 15 years.

The Guam Pacific Daily News reported the military still intends to prosecute Lung on charges originating outside Guam.

To read the full story at UPI.com, click here.

Additional Reporting:

Sailor Gets Life Sentence for Rape Guilty Plea, Stars and Stripes, May 9, 2012

Guam Sailor Pleads to Molestation Charges, NavyTimes/Pacific Daily News, May 8, 2012

Navy Sailor on Guam Charged in Rape of Young Girl, MercuryNews.com, March 23, 2012

The Dark Side of the Prestigious
Marine Barracks

 

Col. Ann Wright
truthdig.com
May 8, 2012

According to Marine Corps lore, semper fidelis, a Latin phrase for “always faithful,” commands Marines to remain a “brotherhood, faithful to the mission at hand, to each other, to the Corps and to country, no matter what. Becoming a Marine is a transformation that cannot be undone and once made, a Marine will forever live by the ethics and values of the Corps.”

The Marine Barracks in Washington, D.C., is the official residence of the commandant of the Marine Corps. It is the home of the Marines who are the ceremonial guard for the president during official U.S. government functions and the security force for the White House and Camp David. The Marine Band, also located at the Barracks, is known as “The President’s Own.” The Barracks is the showplace of the Marine Corps with its Silent Drill Platoon giving weekly military precision performances for the public during the busy summer tourist season.

But the Marine Barracks has its dark and ugly side. It is also the home of officers and enlisted men of the Marine Corps who have been accused of sexually harassing, assaulting and raping female Marine officers and enlisted and civilian women who work there.

To read the full article at the truthdig.com web site, click here.

Military Rape Speech 19 by Congresswoman Jackie Speier

 

Congresswoman Jackie Speier
April 25, 2012

 

 

I rise for the 19th time to highlight the epidemic of rape and sexual assault in the military. By the military’s own figures, 19,000 sexual assaults and rapes occur each year, but only 13% of the members of the military actually report them.

Last week I met with Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta, along with my colleagues to discuss DOD’s new report of data on rape and sexual assault in the military. The report shows a slight increase in reports of rape and assault, but a startling decrease in the number of charges brought against purported perpetrators. With the decrease in charges came significant decrease in prosecution, punishment, and convictions.

The numbers, frankly, are discouraging. I was only pleased about one thing, Secretary Panetta and I agree the only way to solve this problem is with an increase in prosecution. We agree on the result to be achieved but for right now we do not agree on the steps to achieve it. After our meeting, Secretary Panetta announced new initiatives, but DOD’s three major proposals will not increase prosecutions, convictions, or punishments.

 

Click the link to view or read Congresswoman Speier’s 19th speech on military rape.

 

To view Congresswoman Speier’s speeches on military rape, click this usmvaw page link.

 

For additional information:

Rep. Jackie Speier | Rape and Sexual Assault in the Military

Protect Our Defenders

Letter to STOP Act Co-Sponsors (call to action)

 

“H.R. 3435, the Sexual Assault Training Oversight and Prevention Act – or STOP Act which would take the reporting, oversight, investigation and victim care of sexual assaults out of the hands of the military’s normal chain of command and place jurisdiction in the newly created, autonomous Sexual Assault Oversight and Response Office comprised of civilian and military experts.”  (Rep. Jackie Speier)

 

To see the current status of “The STOP Act” click the links below:

STOP Act Summary

The Stop Act: The Sexual Assault Training Oversight and Prevention Act (H.R. 3435)

Violence Against Women Act Prompts Partisan Debate Among Female Lawmakers

 

Jennifer Bendery
Huffington Post
April 25, 2012

The so-called “war on women” raged on in Congress Wednesday as female lawmakers in opposing parties clashed with each other in defense of the Violence Against Women Act, an otherwise bipartisan issue that has fallen prey to election-year fodder.

With the law’s expiration looming in September, Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.) told reporters at a press event that the best way to ensure its reauthorization is to pass the Senate Democratic plan. The proposal has 61 cosponsors — eight Republicans signed on, which means the bill has enough votes to overcome a Senate filibuster — and has previously passed the Senate with unanimous support. Since 1994, VAWA has provided funds to fight domestic violence and sexual assault, and has increased criminal penalties against perpetrators.

“There is no reason that it should be any different this time,” Murray said of the need for all lawmakers to get behind the Democratic bill.

To read the full article on the Huffington Post, click here.

 

Additional Reporting:

Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act

Violence Against Women Act Cannot Be a Victim to Politics, National Task Force to End Sexual and Domestic Violence Against Women,  April 25, 2012

Why We Must Reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act Now, Huffington Post, April 26, 2012

Congress Focuses on Violence Against Women Act, The Washington Post, April 25, 2012

On Renewal of Violence Against Women Act, Senate Democrats Have Upper Hand, Christian Science Monitor, April 25, 2012

House GOP Comes Up With Election-Year Bill to Renew Violence Against Women Act, The Washington Post, April 25, 2012

The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS)

US Department of Justice – Office on Violence Against Women

 

Rep Speier Speaks Out Against Military Rape on CNN Presents

 

April 22, 2012

Congresswoman Speier was featured on the April 22, 2012 CNN Presents special “Betrayal of Trust” to talk about her efforts and legislation to end the epidemic of rape and sexual assault in the military.

The special tells the stories of two young women who were raped while serving as cadets at military service academies and then examines their barriers to justice. Congresswoman Speier explains that justice will only be served when cases of rape and sexual assault are taken out of the chain of command structure.

“If you’re not going to have your assailant prosecuted, why would you want to come forward? Because you’re basically setting yourself up to lose your career in the military,” said Speier.

 

 

 

For additional information:

Rep. Jackie Speier | Rape and Sexual Assault in the Military

Speier Critical Over Military’s Handling of Rape,   KGO-TV,  March 7, 2012

Betrayal of Trust? Allegations of Rape at West Point, Annapolis

Protect Our Defenders

Letter to STOP Act Co-Sponsors (call to action)

 

“H.R. 3435, the Sexual Assault Training Oversight and Prevention Act – or STOP Act which would take the reporting, oversight, investigation and victim care of sexual assaults out of the hands of the military’s normal chain of command and place jurisdiction in the newly created, autonomous Sexual Assault Oversight and Response Office comprised of civilian and military experts.”  (Rep. Jackie Speier)

 

To see the current status of “The STOP Act” click the links below:

STOP Act Summary

The Stop Act: The Sexual Assault Training Oversight and Prevention Act (H.R. 3435)

Stephanie Schroeder, Anna Moore, Jenny McClendon and Panayiota Bertzikis

Rape Victims Say Military Labels Them ‘Crazy’

 

David S. Martin
CNN
April 14, 2012

 

Stephanie Schroeder joined the U.S. Marine Corps not long after 9/11. She was a 21-year-old with an associate’s degree when she reported for boot camp at Parris Island, South Carolina.

“I felt like it was the right thing to do,” Schroeder recalls.

A year and a half later, the Marines diagnosed her with a personality disorder and deemed her psychologically unfit for the Corps.

Anna Moore enlisted in the Army after 9/11 and planned to make a career of it. Moore was a Patriot missile battery operator in Germany when she was diagnosed with a personality disorder and dismissed from the Army.

Jenny McClendon was serving as a sonar operator on a Navy destroyer when she received her personality disorder diagnosis.

These women joined different branches of the military but they share a common experience:

Each received the psychiatric diagnosis and military discharge after reporting a sexual assault.

To read the full article at the CNN web site, click here.

 

Additional Reporting:

Is the Military Labeling Rape Survivors as “Crazy” to Get Rid of Them?  Feministing, April 16, 2012

Rape Victims in Military Given Personality Disorder Diagnosis and Discharged,  The Masculine Heart,  April 15, 2012

Military May Be Gaslighting Sexual Assault Victims, Jezebel, April 14, 2012


Next Page »