The Military Impacts in Hawai’i Should be a Warning to Koreans about the Threat to Jeju Island

 

Kyle Kajihiro
War is a Crime.org
May 10, 2012

It is a grave mistake to claim that military bases have been good for Hawai’i and therefore would be good for Jeju Island.

The U.S. invaded and occupied the sovereign country of Hawai’i in order to build a military outpost. This included the taking of more than 200,000 acres of land for military bases, training and other activities. The result has been the destruction of the environment with more than 900 military contamination sites identified by the Department of Defense. The military’s toxic cocktail includes PCB, perchloroethylene, jet fuel and diesel, mercury, lead, radioactive Cobalt 60, unexploded ordance, perchlorate, and depleted uranium.

When the U.S. took over, especially during WWII, the military seized thousands of acres of Hawaiian land. Whole communities were evicted, their homes, churches and buildings razed or bombed for target practice, their sacred sites destroyed by bombs or imprisoned behind barbed wire.

Recently, hundreds of landless Native Hawaiian families were evicted from a secluded area of O’ahu where they had been living in cars and makeshift tents. They are the internally displaced native people, evidence of the so-called ‘benefits’ of militarization. Meanwhile the military occupies more than 13,000 acres of Hawaiian land, comprising a third of the land in that part of the island.

To read the complete article at warisacrime.org, click here.

 

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220 survivors of military sexual trauma descended on Capitol Hill, May 8, 2012.

Survivors of Military Sexual Trauma’s
Special Delivery to Capitol Hill

 

Scott Wooledge
Daily Kos
May 8, 2012

On May 8, Service Women’s Action Network held their “Truth and Justice Summit,” the first-ever mass convening of survivors of military sexual assault on the nation’s capitol. The schedule inclues a panel of survivors sharing their stories with attendees and the press. There will be an awards luncheon, advocacy training and visits to congressional offices. The aim of the congressional outreach, from SWAN policy director Greg Jacob:

We are asking that Congress educate themselves more on issues of sexual assault and harassment in the military and that they become vocal leaders in holding the military accountable for stopping rape in the ranks.

This is an issue that affects men and women service-wide. The reforms and improvements made thus far have been spearheaded by a relatively small group of legislators, most of them being on the Armed Services committee. It is critical that Congress understand that the issue of military sexual violence affects everyone, including veterans and families in their districts that might not have a military presence.

To read the full story at the Daily Kos, click here.

 

 

Thanks to Susan Avila-Smith for providing the reporting link.

Sailor Sentenced to Life for Raping Girl

 

UPI
May 9, 2012

A U.S. sailor left Guam in Navy custody Wednesday after being sentenced to life in prison for repeatedly raping a girl starting when she was 8 years old.

Petty Officer 1st Class Bradford Laurence Lung, 30, had pleaded guilty Monday to 20 counts of first-degree criminal sexual conduct in Guam Superior Court, Stars and Stripes reported. He will be eligible for parole in 15 years.

The Guam Pacific Daily News reported the military still intends to prosecute Lung on charges originating outside Guam.

To read the full story at UPI.com, click here.

Additional Reporting:

Sailor Gets Life Sentence for Rape Guilty Plea, Stars and Stripes, May 9, 2012

Guam Sailor Pleads to Molestation Charges, NavyTimes/Pacific Daily News, May 8, 2012

Navy Sailor on Guam Charged in Rape of Young Girl, MercuryNews.com, March 23, 2012

Telling the Truth and
Demanding Justice

 

 

Greg Jacobs
SWAN – Huffington Post
May 8, 2012

Today, more than 250 advocates, supporters, lawmakers, family members and survivors of sexual violence in the military will come to Washington, D.C., in a first-of-its-kind event that will inform, empower and move forward critical efforts to eliminate sexual violence within the military.

Truth and Justice, the 2012 Summit on Military Sexual Violence” is being presented by the Service Women’s Action Network (SWAN). SWAN is a groundbreaking civil rights organization that focuses on the needs of service women and veterans. This innovative event will include remarks from several members of Congress, panel discussions from veteran survivors telling their own stories of resilience and reintegration, and military law and policy professionals discussing challenges and strategies for changing the culture and climate around the issue of sexual violence in the military.

To read the full story at the Huffington Post, click here.

A new organization has formed to address rape and gender violence in conflict and war-torn areas around the world.

 

“Organizations and individuals around the world have worked tirelessly to amplify the voices of survivors and stop rape. The International Campaign to Stop Rape & Gender Violence in Conflict unites us into a powerful and coordinated effort for change.

We are the first ever global collaboration between Nobel Peace Laureates, international advocacy organizations, and groups working at the regional and community levels in conflict.

The Campaign will demand urgent and bold political leadership to prevent rape in conflict, to protect civilians and rape survivors, and call for justice for all—including effective prosecution of those responsible. These three pillars of the Campaign—PREVENT, PROTECT, PROSECUTE—signal a comprehensive effort to stop rape in conflict.

Our first four focus countries—Burma, Colombia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Kenya—represent places where immediate, coordinated action is needed. Within these four countries we know that our united efforts can make the biggest impact in the shortest amount of time.

We are excited to announce our launch on May 6 with a Week of Action.
Join us and Take the Pledge.

 

“Don’t forget that this is your Campaign –
every member and every action counts!”

Conference Report 2011 |Women Forging a New Security: Ending Sexual Violence in Conflict

The Dark Side of the Prestigious
Marine Barracks

 

Col. Ann Wright
truthdig.com
May 8, 2012

According to Marine Corps lore, semper fidelis, a Latin phrase for “always faithful,” commands Marines to remain a “brotherhood, faithful to the mission at hand, to each other, to the Corps and to country, no matter what. Becoming a Marine is a transformation that cannot be undone and once made, a Marine will forever live by the ethics and values of the Corps.”

The Marine Barracks in Washington, D.C., is the official residence of the commandant of the Marine Corps. It is the home of the Marines who are the ceremonial guard for the president during official U.S. government functions and the security force for the White House and Camp David. The Marine Band, also located at the Barracks, is known as “The President’s Own.” The Barracks is the showplace of the Marine Corps with its Silent Drill Platoon giving weekly military precision performances for the public during the busy summer tourist season.

But the Marine Barracks has its dark and ugly side. It is also the home of officers and enlisted men of the Marine Corps who have been accused of sexually harassing, assaulting and raping female Marine officers and enlisted and civilian women who work there.

To read the full article at the truthdig.com web site, click here.

“The four major wars in which American women served after World War II can be split into two pairs. Korea and Vietnam were conflicts fought in Asian countries divided by the politics of the Cold War. The Persian Gulf War and the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq were fought in the Middle East and grew out of tensions over aggression in that region and, in the latter instance, the 9/11 attacks. For women, the first two wars signaled few advances in their roles in military service, but in the two recent wars, the areas of women’s participation expanded immensely, with potentially more dire consequences.”

The stories of all women veterans need to be collected and preserved for future generations. And this is especially true for the stories of women who experienced sexual assault while serving their country.

Veterans can submit their own stories using the materials available from the Veterans History Project. To learn how you can participate in The Veterans History Project, click here.