U.S.-Japan Deal Withdraws 9,000 Marines from Okinawa

 

Bob Kovach and Chelsea J. Carter
CNN
April 27, 2012

 

Roughly half the U.S. Marines on Okinawa will be transferred under an agreement announced Thursday that will reduce the military footprint in Japan, easing local resentments over the amount of land being used by American forces.

Some 9,000 Marines along with their family members will be transferred under the agreement, with about 5,000 being sent to Guam as part of a military buildup on the U.S. territory in the Pacific, according to a joint statement released by the U.S.-Japan Security Consultative Committee.

“I am very pleased that, after many years, we have reached this important agreement and plan of action,” Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta said.

To read the full story at the CNN web site, click here.

 

Additional Reporting:

Joint Statement of the Security Consultative Committee, U.S. Department of Defense, April 26, 2012

US, Japan Reach Agreement to Move 9,000 Marines, Voice of America, April 27, 2012

U.S., Japan Agree on Okinawa Troop Relocation, American Forces Press Service, April 27, 2012

US to Move Marines Out of Japan, The Guardian, April 27, 2012

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Statement by the President on Department of Defense Initiatives to Combat Sexual Assault in the Military

 

 

The White House

Office of the Press Secretary
For Immediate Release

April 23, 2012

I applaud the initiatives that Secretary of Defense Leon E. Panetta and General Martin Dempsey, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, have announced to further combat sexual assault in the military. The men and women of the United States military deserve an environment that is free from the threat of sexual assault, and in which allegations of sexual assault are thoroughly investigated, offenders are held appropriately accountable, and victims are given the care and support they need. Elevating these cases to a higher level of command review is a very important step. I believe that sexual assault has no place in our military. I thank Secretary Panetta and Chairman Dempsey and look forward to seeing continued progress on this important issue.

Link to the Official White House Statement

 

Combating Sexual Assault in the United States Military

Department of Defense Initiatives to Combat Sexual Assault in the Military

Panetta, Dempsey Announce Initiatives to Stop Sexual Assault

 

Presidential Proclamation — National Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month, 2012

Presidential Proclamation — National Crime Victims’ Rights Week, 2012

DOD Implements Changes to Sexual Assault Response

 

Army Sgt. 1st Class Tyrone C. Marshall Jr.
American Forces Press Service
April 2, 2012

 

The Defense Department has refined new methods to aid sexual assault victims whether reporting a crime or seeking assistance as they transition from service, the director of the Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office (SAPRO) said here March 30.

“We have several new options for victims of sexual assault,” said Air Force Maj. Gen. Mary Kay Hertog. “First, if you’ve been a victim of sexual assault in the military you now have the option of requesting an expedited transfer. We signed that into effect in December.”

“If you find it untenable or unbearable in the organization that you’re at … you can request to be transferred,” she added.

Hertog said a service member’s local commander has 72 hours to respond to the request for transfer, and if denied there is an option to take it to the first flag or general officer in the chain of command who also has 72 hours to respond.

To read the full article on the U.S. Department of Defense web site, click here.