Stephanie Schroeder, Anna Moore, Jenny McClendon and Panayiota Bertzikis

Rape Victims Say Military Labels Them ‘Crazy’

 

David S. Martin
CNN
April 14, 2012

 

Stephanie Schroeder joined the U.S. Marine Corps not long after 9/11. She was a 21-year-old with an associate’s degree when she reported for boot camp at Parris Island, South Carolina.

“I felt like it was the right thing to do,” Schroeder recalls.

A year and a half later, the Marines diagnosed her with a personality disorder and deemed her psychologically unfit for the Corps.

Anna Moore enlisted in the Army after 9/11 and planned to make a career of it. Moore was a Patriot missile battery operator in Germany when she was diagnosed with a personality disorder and dismissed from the Army.

Jenny McClendon was serving as a sonar operator on a Navy destroyer when she received her personality disorder diagnosis.

These women joined different branches of the military but they share a common experience:

Each received the psychiatric diagnosis and military discharge after reporting a sexual assault.

To read the full article at the CNN web site, click here.

 

Additional Reporting:

Is the Military Labeling Rape Survivors as “Crazy” to Get Rid of Them?  Feministing, April 16, 2012

Rape Victims in Military Given Personality Disorder Diagnosis and Discharged,  The Masculine Heart,  April 15, 2012

Military May Be Gaslighting Sexual Assault Victims, Jezebel, April 14, 2012


Advertisements

Betrayal of Trust?
Allegations of Rape at
West Point, Annapolis

 

Kyra Phillips and Jessi Joseph
CNN.com
April 22, 2012

 

Karley Marquet and Annie Kendzior said they enrolled at two of the nation’s most prestigious military academies to serve their country and become military officers. Instead, they claim, they were raped — and their military careers are now over.

In a lawsuit filed in U.S. Federal Court on Friday, the women claim the U.S. Military Academy in West Point, New York, and the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland, ignored “rampant sexual harassment.”

The suit claims former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates, the former superintendents of the two academies and the current secretaries of the Army and Navy are “personally responsible” for failing to “prevent rapes and sexual assaults at the Naval Academy and West Point.”

Karley Marquet was a high school honor student, championship swimmer and all-star rugby player. She could have gone to college anywhere with her credentials, but Marquet chose West Point.

“When I was accepted, it was kind of overwhelming,” she says. “You can’t imagine having that structure and discipline but at the same time having people look at you like, ‘Wow, you’re doing something great for our country.'”

But Marquet said her dream of becoming an officer was shattered in January 2011, her second semester at West Point.

To read the full story at CNN.com, click here.

 

To read the lawsuit filed against West Point and the Naval Academy on behalf of Karley Marquet and Annie Kendzior, click here.

If you were raped or sexually assaulted while on active duty in 2002 or later, you may be able to join the ongoing litigation efforts supported by Protect Our Defenders, the Service Women’s Action Network, and others. Please contact the Burke PLLC paralegal Miranda Petersen at mpetersen@burkepllc.com for more information.

 

Additional Reporting:

Protect Our Defenders Supports Lawsuit Against US Military For Failure to Protect Cadets at Service Academies from Rape or Sexual Assault

Two MORE Female U.S Service Members Claim They Were Raped at Military Academies Then Punished for Reporting the Assaults, MailOnline, April 21, 2012

Women Sue West Point and Naval Academy for Being Awful to Rape Victims, Jezebel, April 21, 2012

Former Mid Sues Naval Academy Over Rapes, Baltimore Sun, April 20, 2012

Former Mid Files Federal Lawsuit Over Alleged Rape, hometownannapolis.com, April 20, 2012

2 Sue Service Academies Over Assault Response, ArmyTimes, April 20, 2012

Sexual Assault in the Military –
SAPRO Annual Report, DoD Initiatives

 

The Pentagon’s top civilian and military leaders took their campaign to stop sexual assault in the military to Capitol Hill, where they announced new initiatives to combat the problem.

“General Dempsey and I consider this a serious problem that needs to be addressed,” Secretary Panetta said. “It violates everything the U.S. military stands for.”

The U.S. Department of Defense released a statement on April 16, 2012 regarding the issue of sexual assault in the military.

The initiatives include:

  • Establishing with congressional approval a “special victims’ unit” within each service composed of specially trained experts in evidence collection, interviewing and working with victims;
  • Requiring that sexual assault policies be explained to all service members within 14 days of their entry into active duty;
  • Allowing National Guard and Reserve personnel who have been sexually assaulted to remain on active duty status to obtain the treatment and support afforded to active-duty members;
  • Requiring a record of the outcome of disciplinary and administrative proceedings related to sexual assault and retaining the records centrally;
  • Requiring commanders to conduct annual organizational climate assessments to measure whether they are meeting the department’s goal of a culture of professionalism and zero tolerance of sexual assault;
  • Enhancing training programs for sexual assault prevention, including training for new military commanders in handling sexual assault matters; and
  • Mandating wider public dissemination of available sexual assault resources, such as DOD’s “Safe Helpline,” a 24/7 helpline via Web, phone or text message operated by the nonprofit Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network.

To read the full Armed Forces Press Service article, click here.

 

 

US Department of Defense
Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office

 

US Department of Defense SAPRO – Annual Reports

Fact Sheet on Department of Defense Annual Report on Sexual Assault in the Military for Fiscal 2011 April 13, 2012  (DoD)

Briefing Paper: Department of Defense (DoD) Annual Report on Sexual Assault in the Military, Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 – Service Women’s Action Network (SWAN)

 

Media Coverage and Editorials:

Leon Panetta Lays Out New Rules to Combat Sexual Assault in U.S. Military,  The Daily Beast, April 18, 2012

Right Steps on Military Sexual Assault, The New York Times (Editorial), April 17, 2012

Panetta Offers Steps to Curb Sex Assault in Military, Reuters, April 16, 2012

Panetta, Dempsey Announce Initiatives to Stop Sexual Assault, Armed Forces Press Service, April 16, 2012

Melissa Harris-Perry

The Enemy Within:
Sexual Assault in the US Military
Melissa Harris-Perry (msnbc)

 

On April 22nd msnbc’s Melissa Harris-Perry, welcomed msnbc contributor, Attorney Raul Reyes, former Marine Officer Ariana Klay, and Congresswoman Jackie Speier to discuss sexual assault, military culture and the response of the chain of command to reports of violence against service members.

To watch the segment on Melissa Harris-Perry, click the link below:

Melissa Harris-Perry on sexual assault in the US military

Additional MHP links:

Melissa Harris-Perry’s web site

MHP Show | msnbc.com

CNO: ‘Sexual Assault is an Attack on a Sailor’

 

Sam Fellman
Navy Times
April 2, 2012

Across the force, Navy personnel will attend educational standdowns in April that highlight ways sailors can respond to — and prevent — sexual assaults. The two hours worth of training is part of the Navy’s latest initiative to get sailors to report more offenses and to reduce the stubbornly-high number of assaults. It emphasizes that watching out for each other is everyone’s responsibility.

 

 

As for the severity of the problem, Navy officials are not mincing words.

“Folks, we’ve got to face the facts — sexual assault is an attack on a sailor,” Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jon Greenert wrote in post entitled “We have a problem…” on his official blog Sunday. “On average, these attacks take place every day.”

To read the full article at the Navy Times web site, click here.

 

Navy Personal Command — Sexual Assault