The Invisible War

 

Free Film Screening!!

 

Date: April 17th, 2012

Time: 5:00-8:00 pm
Location: California State University San Marcos
Academic Hall 102

 

About the film:

THE INVISIBLE WAR is a groundbreaking investigative documentary about one of our country’s most shameful and best kept secrets: the epidemic of rape within our US military. Today, a female soldier in Iraq and Afghanistan is more likely to be raped by a fellow soldier than killed by enemy fire with the number of assaults in the last decade alone in the hundreds of thousands.

Focusing on the powerfully emotional stories of several young women, the film reveals the systemic cover up of the crimes against them and follows their struggles to rebuild their lives and fight for justice. THE INVISIBLE WAR features hard-hitting interviews with high-ranking military officials and members of Congress that reveal the perfect storm conditions that exist for rape in the military, its history of cover-up, and what can be done to bring about much needed change.”

A Panel discussion about Military Sexual Trauma will follow the film. Please join us for a free film and interesting discussion. Refreshments will be provided.

For more information or if you have any questions regarding the event please email us at csusmwssa@gmail.com

This event is co-sponsored by the following California State University San Marcos groups: The Veteran’s Center, ASI Women’s Center, Women’s Studies Department, and Women’s Studies Student Association.

 

The Invisible War: New Film Exposes Rape, Sexual Assault Epidemic in U.S. Military Democracy Now!   January 30, 2012

The Invisible War — film web site

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UPDATE:  Truth and Justice:
2012 Summit on Military Sexual Violence

 

Service Women’s Action Network (SWAN) is sponsoring a one day Truth and Justice conference May 8th  in Washington, DC to give MST survivors the opportunity to share their stories with congress members, policy experts and the general public, coupled with key panels on major topics involving military sexual violence and survivors’ access to justice.

In 2010, the Department of Defense (DOD) documented 3,158 reports of military sexual assault, but concluded that only 13.5% of total cases were actually reported. DOD estimates that in 2010 alone, over 19,000 sexual assaults occurred in the military. Survivors who do report experiences of rape or sexual assault rarely receive justice because discretion is allocated to military commanders, thus bringing less than 21% of alleged perpetrators to court-martial; even fewer are convicted or sentenced to prison. For more information, please see the SWAN factsheet on Rape, Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the Military.

 

Summit Schedule:

Locations and Speakers TBA

7-8:15a – Welcome, Registration

8:15a – Opening Remarks

8:30 – 9:45a – Panel 1

Challenges and Strategies for Change

10a – 11:30a – Panel 2

Survivors and Family Members Tell Their Stories

11:30a-1p – Lunch, Keynote, Awards Ceremony

1-1:45p – Advocacy Training

2p-5p – Congressional Visits

5p – Reconvene, Closing Remarks

 

For more information about SWAN’s Truth and Justice Summit, click here

To contact the SWAN Legal and Peer Support Helpline, click here.

Panetta, Gates, Rumsfeld Face New Suit Over U.S. Military Rape ‘Epidemic’

 

In a lawsuit filed Tuesday, the U.S. military’s top brass are accused of refusing to take action on sexual assault in the ranks and ignoring congressional mandates.

Jesse Ellison
The Daily Beast
March 6, 2012

Ariana Klay’s assignment to Marine Barracks Washington should have been the cherry on top of an already illustrious military and academic career. A National Merit scholar and superstar athlete, Klay was recruited by the Naval Academy, becoming the first member of her family to attend college. After a stint at Camp Pendleton, she served an eight-month tour in Iraq before being tapped for the prestigious base.

But shortly after her arrival, she tells The Daily Beast, the base chaplain took her aside and warned her to be careful. Within days, she says, junior Marines were calling her “slut” and “whore.” In December 2009, four months after her arrival, Klay formally requested deployment to Afghanistan. The request was denied—as were three subsequent ones. Seven months later, she says, a senior Marine officer and his friend came into her home, a block from the base, and gang-raped her. But that was just the beginning of Klay’s ordeal: because of the retaliation she says she was subjected to after reporting the rape, she fell into a deep depression, and last March she attempted suicide.

 

 

To read the full article at The Daily Beast, click here.

 

Look at the links below for more information about the documentary, The Invisible War:

The Invisible War of Military Women

The Invisible War

Cinedigm Picks up Sundance Documentary “Invisible War”

Sundance Institute | Online Film Guide

Lawsuit Claims Rape, Misconduct at D.C. Marine Barracks

 

Michael Isikoff
Today.com
March 6, 2012

Eight current and former U.S. service members are today accusing U.S. military officials of tolerating a “staggering” level of sexual assaults within their ranks in a lawsuit that focuses in part on events at one of the most prestigious Marine Corps bases in the country — the U.S. Marine Barracks in Washington D.C.

The lawsuit includes graphic charges by two former Marine Corps officers: One, Ariana Klay, a Naval Academy graduate and Iraq war veteran, charges she was gang-raped at the Barracks in Aug. 2010. Elle Helmer, the former Barracks public information officer, says she was raped by a superior officer at the Barracks in March 2006.

To read and view the reporting at Today.com, click here.

 

To read more about this issue at The Invisible War web site, including information about the lawsuit filed today by attorney Susan Burke , click here.

 

Additional reporting on this issue:

Rape in the Military Lawsuit Filed in Federal Court Today

Service Members Suing US Military for Sexual Assaults

8 Women Allege Rape, Harassment in Military Suit

(Thanks to the Military Rape Crisis Center for compiling reporting on this issue)

 

Amy Goodman
Democracy Now!
January 30, 2012

On the heels of a new military survey that the number of reported violent sex crimes jumped 30 percent in 2011, with active-duty female soldiers ages 18 to 21 accounting for more than half of the of the victims, we speak with Trina McDonald and Kori Cioca, two subjects of “The Invisible War,” a new documentary that examines the epidemic of rape of soldiers within the U.S. military, which won the Audience Award at the 2012 Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah.

“Not only was I astounded by the numbers, but when I started talking to the women and men who had experienced this, I was just so devastated by their stories,” says the film’s Academy Award-nominated director, Kirby Dick. “These are women and men who are very idealistic. They joined the military because they wanted to serve their country. They were incredible soldiers. And then, when they were assaulted, they had the courage to come forward, even though many people advised them not to,” Dick says.

For the full interview with Amy Goodman, visit the Democracy Now! web site, here.

To visit the site for the movie,  The Invisible War, click here.