The Pentagon Is Camouflaging the Truth About Rape in the Military

 

Nancy Parrish
Huffington Post
April 20, 2012

On Friday of last week, the Department of Defense issued its Annual Report on Sexual Assault in the Military. First conducted in 2004, this report has helped shine a light on the severity and scope of the crisis of rape in the US military. The disturbing statistics that have been reported include the stunning estimate that, in FY 2010, there were 19,000 sexual assaults among Active Duty personnel.

The 2011 report validates our worst fears. The data shows that the military’s handling of sexual assaults is getting worse, much worse. Charges, courts-martial and convictions plummeted, but there is absolutely no indication that sex crimes decreased.

But while the report is extremely troubling, of even greater concern is the Pentagon’s determined effort to confuse and misinform the public about its own findings.

To read the full piece at the Huffington Post, click here.

 

To reach for web site archive of  the Department of Defense Annual Reports on Sexual Assaults in the Military, click here.

 

 

Nancy Parrish is the President of Protect Our Defenders.

 

Click here to learn more about how the organization is working to “honor, support and give voice to the brave women and men in uniform who have been raped or sexually assaulted by fellow service members. “

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DOD Implements Changes to Sexual Assault Response

 

Army Sgt. 1st Class Tyrone C. Marshall Jr.
American Forces Press Service
April 2, 2012

 

The Defense Department has refined new methods to aid sexual assault victims whether reporting a crime or seeking assistance as they transition from service, the director of the Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office (SAPRO) said here March 30.

“We have several new options for victims of sexual assault,” said Air Force Maj. Gen. Mary Kay Hertog. “First, if you’ve been a victim of sexual assault in the military you now have the option of requesting an expedited transfer. We signed that into effect in December.”

“If you find it untenable or unbearable in the organization that you’re at … you can request to be transferred,” she added.

Hertog said a service member’s local commander has 72 hours to respond to the request for transfer, and if denied there is an option to take it to the first flag or general officer in the chain of command who also has 72 hours to respond.

To read the full article on the U.S. Department of Defense web site, click here.

 

Military Rape Speech 18 by Congresswoman Jackie Speier

 

 

“Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I rise again to highlight the epidemic of sexual assault and rape in the military.

Next week will mark the one-year anniversary of my first floor speech on this issue. That day I told the story of Technical Sergeant Mary Gallagher who was raped by a co-worker while deployed in Iraq. The week leading up to the rape, Sergeant Gallagher’s assailant harassed her, stalked her and attempted to break into her room. Though she twice reported the assailant’s threatening behavior, her command did nothing about it. They called it a, quote, “he said, she said scenario.”

Justice was not served.”

To read the full speech by Congresswoman Jackie Speier, click here.

 

 Are you a survivor of rape or sexual assault in the military? 

Congresswoman Speier is personally inviting you to share your story by e-mailing stopmilitaryrape@mail.house.gov. If you choose to share your experience with the Congresswoman, please indicate whether or not you are willing to give her your permission to share it on the House floor.

If you have experienced rape, sexual assault or harassment in military service, know that there are resources to help you. 

 

24/7 Emergency Crisis Care with offices in
Washington DC and Cambridge MA.
MRCC also has representatives in 35 states
as well as Japan, Germany and England.

Survivor Support Network:
Services, Resources, Hotlines, MST Forums, and Suggestions

Sexual Assault Support for the DoD Community

Sexual Assault in the Military a DOD Cover Up?

by Col. Ann Wright
OpEdNews.com
August 3, 2008

There was quite a struggle in Congress this week. The Department of Defense refused to allow the senior civilian in charge of its Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office (SAPRO) to testify in Thursday’s hearing on sexual assault in the military. Rep. John Tierney, chair of the House Subcommittee on National Security and Foreign Affairs, angrily dismissed Principal Deputy Undersecretary of Defense Michael Dominguez from the hearing when Dominguez said that he, the DoD chief of legislative affairs and the chief of public affairs, had ordered Dr. Kaye Whitley, chief of SAPRO, to refuse to honor the subpoena issued by the subcommittee for her appearance. 

Click here to read more on the OpEdNews.com web site